Diabetic Retinopathy is an eye disease that affects people with diabetes. This is a condition wherein the blood vessels in the retina are damaged, causing a disturbance in vision; if left untreated, the condition worsens, leading to a permanent loss of sight.

Diabetic Retinopathy affects people with high blood sugar levels, regardless of whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Read through if you want to know the causes and symptoms related to the ailment.

Causes

Blood vessels provide nutrition to the retina. When these vessels weaken, get impaired or grow abnormally due to the consistent uncontrolled glucose levels in the blood, they restrict the blood supply to the retina, leading to poor vision and full blindness in extreme situations.

The risk is higher in the following cases:

  • Poor control of blood sugar levels
  • Hypertension
  • Pregnancy
  • Hypercholesterolemia
  • Long duration/history of diabetes
  • Smokers

If you have a history of diabetes running in your family or begun to experience changes in your blood glucose levels, make sure to get tested regularly in order to prevent serious conditions.

Symptoms

It is difficult to detect diabetic retinopathy in its early stages; the symptoms begin to show only when the disease progresses. Diabetic Retinopathy generally affects both the eyes. Here are some of the common symptoms associated with the disease.

  • Blurred or diminished vision
  • Black spots or floaters in vision
  • Empty areas observed in the visual field
  • Impaired color vision
  • Fluctuating vision
  • Loss of vision